Ted Land

My mother, Ethel Winifred Land (1915-1999) was married twice: 1941: Les Rash of Bow, East London 1944: William Franklin Etherden of Morden, south-west London. One of her two older brothers, Edward Land (1913-1993), lived for most of his adult life with the Society of Brothers. I included their story in the historical novel The Summer of ’39 written under the pseudonym of Thomas Ericsson. It can be found here.

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John F. Etherden

Mr. J. F. Etherden Leaves Minehead

Suburban Retirement After a Varied Career

Source: The West Somerset Free Press on Saturday December 26, 1936

John F. Etherden was born in Faversham, Kent in 1874, the son of Charles Etherden, born in Harwich in 1822, and Sarah Norris of Greenwich who Charles married in 1851. John F. Etherden’s father, Charles, was one of ten children born to John Etherden of Harwich (1791-1865) and Mary Coker of Ipswich who married John in 1817.

Adventures by Land and Sea

Mr. John F. Etherden and Mrs. Etherden said ‘Goodbye’ to Minehead last Monday. Well, perhaps not ‘Goodbye’. Rather ‘Au Revoir’ for they hope to see Minehead and their many friends here in the future, as visitors, at any rate. They have gone to live at Morton Park, near Wimbledon, and with them go the best wishes of all in West Somerset who know them, for many pleasant and healthful years of retirement. The Red Lion Hotel of which they have been host and hostess for something like twenty years is now ‘under new management’. Their place there has been taken by Mr. and Mrs. L.D. Hooper who return to Minehead – they were formerly at the Pier Hotel – after some years at Lynton.

It is only a few months ago that Mr. Etherden was chairman of the Minehead Urban District Council, and mention of this fact will bring to mind the many years of service which he gave to the town as a member of that body. To mention his association with a few other local activities, such as the fire brigade, of which he was honorary captain, the British Legion, Freemasonry, the R.A.O.B., the Lifeboat Institution, the National Union of General Workers, the Minehead Regatta, etc., is to recall that his interests while he was at Minehead were wide and varied and advantageous to the community.

‘Roughing It’ at 8

As many of his friends know, Mr. Etherden has had an interesting and roving career, and a ‘Free Press’ representative who went to bid him farewell managed to elicit from him some of the highlights of that career, which began when he had just entered his ‘teens. He was one of a large family born at Faversham, Kent, and as his parents’ circumstances were limited he, with the other youngsters, had soon to make contact with a hard world. “As a boy of eight,” Mr. Etherden recalled, “I was sent on board a Thames barge and I roughed it there until I was fourteen. Then I joined a four-masted barque, the Blythswood, and sailed in her from West India Docks for Australia. The trip out took 92 days – a fairly smart voyage as things went in those days. This was in 1888. Homeward bound we were dismasted in a sudden squall off Durban, but we were towed into Durban and refitted and completed the voyage home.”

In 1889 Mr. Etherden joined the Royal Navy, and while in that Service served on H.M.S. Impregnable, H.M.S. Thames, H.M.S. Vivid, H.M.S. Cleopatra, and H.M.S. Pigeon, rising to the rank of Chief Petty Officer. His first commission with the Navy was with H.M.S. Cleopatra, on the North American and West Indian stations. During this period they went as far north as Baffin’s Bay in quest of any trace they could find of Lieut. Peary’s North Pole expedition (1891-2), which was thought to be lost. Their search was unsuccessful, but on their return to St. John’s Newfoundland, they found that Peary had returned safely, having passed the Cleopatra in thick fog, “While on this Northern trip,” said Mr. Etherden, “we were frozen up in the Straits of Belle Isle. During that time we had all sorts of recreations on the ice. We played football there and we had field gun practice. We eventually forced our way through the strait and our ship was the first ship ever to get through.”

A South American Experience

“We had some exciting experiences on the West Indies station,” Mr. Etherden recalled. “We landed to quell a rebellion of the Mosquito Indians against the Nicaraguans at Bluefields in Central America. The Mosquitos, who were under British suzerainty, had come down from the mountains and raided Bluefields and terrorized the inhabitants. There were no casualties on our side, but many of the rebels were killed or wounded. We were relieved on that job by two U.S. warships. Then we were at Bermuda when a big magazine near the docks caught fire and our crew was rushed ashore to empty the magazine of live shells and explosives while the fire was raging. It was considered a very risky job, but the bluejackets probably saved the island from a disastrous explosion.”

On paying off the Cleopatra, Mr. Etherden was appointed signal-instructor to the training ship, H.M.S. Ganges, at Falmouth, in which capacity he served for two years. During that time he took part in the great Naval review at Spithead when Queen Victoria’s Silver Jubilee was celebrated, his commission on that occasion being the five-masted iron-clad Agememnon, one of the last of the old masted ships in the Service. He was also in charge of a party of boys from the Ganges who formed a guard of honour at St. Paul’s Cathedral when the Queen attended the thanksgiving service there.

“My next commission,” he stated, “was in the Persian Gulf in H.M.S. Pigeon chasing slavers. Our most eventful happening on this ship was a trip from Colombo to the Seychelles on which we experienced such rough weather that we arrived ten days overdue with not a bit of coal and all the wood fittings gone; they had all been burned to keep up steam. And the ship’s company was so exhausted that when they went ashore they forgot to return for five days. That caused a good deal of trouble at the time but afterwards we settled down into one of the best ships afloat.”

The Boxer rebellion in 1899, when Mr. Etherden went to Hong Kong with the British Navy contingent, provided another chapter of interest in his career. This was the last of the navy for he purchased his discharge at the end of 1899.

Fire Brigade Service

On leaving the Navy Mr. Etherden joined the London Fire-brigade, then under Commander Wells. “After two years of that I resigned,” he continued, “to join Baden-Powell’s South African Constabulary for the rest of the Boer War. When peace was declared and I was demobilized I joined the Durban Fire-brigade. I passed through all grades in that, including the fire-float to that of engineer-in-charge. We had some tidy fires to deal with there. One of the biggest was a blaze of prairie grass, something like half a million tons, on the docks. It lasted for about three weeks.”

For about eight weeks Mr. Etherden was in the Durban Fire-brigade. Then he resigned and went to sea again, this time as fifth engineer on a vessel bound for New Zealand. This was in 1906. She carried as passengers – unwilling ones to a great extent – Australian men, women and children who were being repatriated from South Africa. “When we got to New Zealand,” said Mr. Etherden, “I noticed a placard which stated ‘Rebellion in Zululand’. I immediately made my way to the docks, discovered a ship sailing for Durban, and booked my passage. On arriving there I went to headquarters of the Durban Light Infantry and joined up, and I was promoted corporal and sent out recruiting. I picked up one of the roughest gangs in the world, I should think, and as they had all seen service of some sort or another they were very soon knocked into shape.” Mr. Etherden took his ‘recruits’ to Bond’s Drift, on the Tugola River, and joined up with another force, but the rebellion was practically over by then and all that they were required to do was to round up scattered Zulu warriors. The Zulus had ‘kicked over the traces’ on the question of poll tax and had killed two or three white inspectors. The rebellion only lasted about six weeks, and although he was only in at the end of it Mr. Etherden received the medal.

Back to England

The Durban Light Infantry were disbanded after the rebellion, and now Mr. Etherden went to the Transvaal and secured a billet with the East Rand Fire-brigade. He was appointed fire-master with full power to reorganize a full-time and an auxiliary brigade, in which he succeeded in giving satisfaction. “Our biggest fire, while I was with the brigade, was in one of the principal gold mines on the Rand – the Cason Main Shaft. “The brigade with the mine shaft were engaged for several days on this fire.”

In 1912 Mr. Etherden returned to England, though only with the intention of taking a holiday here. But he decided to remain and bought the Imperial Hotel, Leicester. The Great War stirred the adventurous spirit again, and early in 1915 he “sold out” with a view to rejoining the Navy. But in this he was unsuccessful and he then came West – to Minehead – to become tenant of the Red Lion Hotel, but it was not until after the War that he settled down in it, for, joining the R.N.A.S., he managed to “do his bit” on Channel patrol duty and also as kite balloon instructor at Roehampton.

After demobilization in 1919, Mr. Etherden soon demonstrated an inclination to civic service by allowing himself to be nominated as a candidate for the Council. He was among those returned, and except for a period of about two years, when he went to South Africa, he was on the Council up to April of this year [1936], being chairman for the last twelve months. His health has not been very satisfactory in recent years and he did not feel disposed to stand again at the last election. As a result of his going on to the Council the Minehead Fire-brigade had the full benefit of his years of practical experience and knowledge of fire-fighting services. Becoming chief officer he undertook the reorganization and training of the brigade, and exerted himself keenly in securing an up-to-date motor-engine and escape, and it is to his efforts that Minehead owes the very efficient fire-brigade and service of which the town is proud today. Mr. Etherden’s later appointment as honorary captain was an acknowledgement of the services which he had thus rendered.

Mr. Etherden’s Successor

Mr. Hooper, who has succeeded Mr. Etherden at the Red Lion Hotel, has been, since he left the Pier Hotel, proprietor of the Queen’s Hotel, Lynton. He, too, has been prominent in the life of that place. He was a member of the Urban Council there, chairman of the British Legion branch, a chorister at the parish church, hon. treasurer of the local rifle club, and a great supporter of football. Before he left Lynton for Minehead British Legion members presented him with a framed testimonial in recognition of his service as chairman of the Lynton branch.

John F. Etherden was born in Faversham, Kent in 1874, the son of Charles Etherden, born in Harwich in 1822, and Sarah Norris of Greenwich who Charles married in 1851. John F. Etherden’s father, Charles, was one of ten children born to John Etherden of Harwich (1791-1865) and Mary Coker of Ipswich who married John in 1817.

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Hogg-Hailsham Clan

Famous ancestors on my father’s side of the family are few and far between. The Australian branch of the family can be traced back to Benjamin Etherden who was apprehended in Lamberhurst for stealing a pair of shoes, sentenced to death and then transported to Botany Bay; and the last century saw Etherdens serving with distinction in the London Fire Brigade and the Royal Mint.

But otherwise, except for a Chair Bodger [1] in Sussex…an honourable profession in the 17th century…and a Thames Barge skipper or two freighting bricks from the River Lea to the London Docks, the Etherdens’ and Eatherdens’ have distinguished themselves mainly by keeping out of harm’s way and maintaining their ancestral line.

However there have been hints that my mother ‘married beneath her’. As such judgements still carried meaning in the middle of the last century, my search for distinguished ancestors has now turned to the matrilineal line where we have the names of Wyatt, Crump and Hogg…and specifically a Lylie Hogg who married a Crump.

It was Lylie Hogg’s daughter who married my great grandfather James Land. The Lands, Hoggs and Crumps then joined geneological forces with the Wyatts when James’ son…also James…married Louisa Wyatt. In the fullness of time they became known to their grandchildren growing up in the 1950s just inside the London County Council border with the County of Kent as Nanna and Grandpop. [2]

Grandpop was a supervisor at the London Docks with a house at 143 Greenvale Road in Eltham Park and an allotment on the other side of the Eltham Road…just opposite the bus stop for the number 21 bus to Sidcup and Farningham. He worked his allotment every Sunday so one of the more enduring memories I have from my childhood is of Grandpop arriving home for Sunday lunch loaded up with produce from the allotment.

After lunch he would play shove ha’penny and dominoes with his grandchildren before retiring into a corner to smoke his pipe. Grandpop died of cancer at a relatively young age of 67 and was the only person I knew who smoked a pipe. After her husband died Nanna moved to Penhill Road in Bexley and lived to the grand old age of 93, although blind for her last ten years.

My mother was born in 1915 so I calculate that my grandparents would have been born around 1880…my mother was the youngest of four children…and Lylie Hogg two generations prior to this around 1830. So this is where the search for my Hogg connection will commence.

The Hoggs have come closest to becoming the great British political dynasty of the 20th century [3]. In the House of Lords, the highest office is that of Lord Chancellor, a position held by Douglas Hogg (Lord Hailsham) in 1928-9 and 1935-8, and by his son Quinton (Lord Hailsham) from 1979 to 1987.

Neville Chamberlain and Douglas Hogg were considered to be contenders to succeed Baldwin as Tory leader in 1927. Some thirty years later, in 1963, his son relinquished the Hailsham title to fight for the party leadership.

The third generation continued this involvement in Conservative Party politics with Douglas Hogg as Agriculture Secretary in John Major’s government and his wife, Sarah, heading up the Prime Minister’s Policy Unit.

Notes

[1] A bodger was a skilled craftsman that made chair legs and braces. The craft of bodging goes back about five hundred years and demonstrations of bodging can still be seen at many traditional craft fairs. In the towns and cities repairing chairs was a common profession for injured or retired sailors. They would often set up shop in a quiet alley and send their wife or a child out to solicit work. The name Bodger may have derived from Badger, as the life of a bodger was similar in many ways as they spent the whole day in the wood only coming out in the evening.

[2] The exact address was 124 Crookston Road, which is at the newer end of the street where the Bilton Estates houses built in 1936 back onto Oxleas Woods on the slopes of Shooters Hill.

[3] This judgement comes from Graham Stewart, author of Burying Caesar: Churchill, Chamberlain and the Battle for the Tory Party (Weidenfeld & Nicholson, London, 1999, ISBN 0 75381 060 3).

Peter Etherden

August 9th 2010

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Land Clan

At the tail end of 1987 a discussion with my mother threw up some more information on her side of the family. Here is a more organised set of notes from those scribbled down at the end of the eleventh journal.

My mother, Ethel Winifred Land, was born at an infirmary in Southwark on July 15th 1915 as the fourth child of James Land and Louisa Wyatt. Her father had a brother Len, a sister Florrie and another sister Hilda Land who is still alive and living in Bognor Regis with another Land (May).

On her father’s side (through her father’s mother) there are the family names of Hogg and Crump. My mother never knew her mother’s mother but did know something about her father’s mother who had the Crump name and was somehow ‘mixed up with gold mining in South Africa’. Her mother Louisa Wyatt…my maternal grandmother…had two sisters who ‘went into service’, one of them in a large house in Blackheath. Apart from this sister, my mother remembers nothing of her mother’s people and does not remember having anything much to do with them.

My mother’s memory of my grandfather’s family centres on two characters. There was her own grandfather James Land who was ‘mixed up with show business’ and was in charge of a big annual charity concert at the London Palladium. And then there was the memorable Aunt Priscilla and a Lylie Hogg of whom she told me a little.

Aunt Priscilla was ‘mixed up with the Crumps’ and ‘had pots of money’. She lived in a big old Victorian house in the Old Kent Road, shopped at Harrods and ‘had shares in a South African diamond mine’. My mother and her brother Ted used to love going there and she has many memories of ‘fun and mischief’. ‘Everything in the house was musical’. My mother once showed me a photograph of her. She was a ‘big woman’…large, stern and dressed in black in the way of Victorian portraits. Her husband John is dominated by his wife in the photograph.

My mother has vivid memories of John and Priscilla. ‘Dear John,’ Aunt Priscilla would say, ‘go down to the basement and fetch some wine. Go straight down. Don’t touch a thing. And come straight back!’ When Aunt Priscilla died John threw open the house and the wine cellars to the whole of the Old Kent Road…and drank himself to death in four days flat! Attempting to accommodate this into a family tree leaves us with something like this:

The Lands of Eltham

The Lands of Eltham

My mother’s marriage to my father, William Franklin Etherden, was her second. Her first was to Les Rash from Bow in London’s East End who was reported missing and eventually presumed dead in the disastrous 1941 invasion of Greece…there is a record at the allied cemetery in Piraeus.

On the mantelpiece in my mother’s (and my father’s) bedroom was a photograph of her first husband mounted upon a camel with the pyramids as a backdrop…the invasion force for the Greek Campaign had been recruited from Montgomery’s Eighth Army. During the 1950s my mother would travel across the River Thames once a month to visit ‘Nanna Rash’…her mother-in-law.

We knew my mother’s siblings and their families. But apart from them, the only relatives we knew well…because they lived close to us on Dumbreck Road in Eltham was another of my mother’s aunts…Florrie. She was my grandfather’s sister and emigrated to Canada after her marriage to Will Woodstock, who survived her by many years well into his late eighties.

A visit to Aunty Florrie and Uncle Will was obligatory at Christmas. We had afternoon tea and always came away with half a crown each. Aunty Florrie played the piano fairly well, playing from sheet music many of the Tin Pan Alley musical favourites of the early years of the century…songs like ‘How much is the doggie in the window?’ are ingrained in my memory as a perennial feature of Christmas at Aunty Florrie’s. She had a dog…a white fluffy scotch terrier…and was the only relative I remember that had any animals in her house…a dog and a budgerigar.

Peter Etherden

2nd June 1989

The Philpott Letters

2006-03-06 @ 14:44:57

Dear Peter
You may not remember me, but we met many moons ago at the house of your Aunt Freda (Tup) in Weston-super-Mare.

I was married to your cousin Bill for many years, and we had 3 children. Now I am a grandma and I am creating the family tree for the children. I am trying to find out about the LAND side of the family – can you send details of their history?

I remember your mum well as she used to visit with Freda often – and I also remember your Grandma LAND and Auntie Florrie. But as to other names, dates, etc, I have no idea, and Bill doesn’t seem to know anything either.

I hope you can find time to reply.

Yours
Sue
irene-jack@wanadoo.fr


Peter Etherden

http://williamshepherd.blog.co.uk

2006-04-08 @ 14:59:28

At the tail end of 1987 a discussion with my mother threw up some more information on her side of the family. Here is a more organised set of notes from those scribbled down at the end of the eleventh journal.
My mother, Ethel Winifred Land, was born at an infirmary in Southwark on July 15th 1915 as the fourth child of James Land and Louisa Wyatt. Her father had a brother Len, a sister Florrie and another sister Hilda Land who is still alive and living in Bognor Regis with another Land (May). On her father’s side (presumably through her father’s mother) there are the family names of Hogg and Crump. My mother never knew her mother’s mother but did know something about her father’s mother who had the Crump name and was somehow ‘mixed up with gold mining in South Africa’. Her mother Louisa Wyatt…my maternal grand mother…had two sisters who ‘went into service’, one of them in a large house in Blackheath. Apart from this sister, my mother remembers nothing of her mother’s people and does not remember having anything much to do with them.
My mother’s memory of my grandfather’s family centres on two characters. There was her own grandfather James Land who was ‘mixed up with show business’ and was in charge of a big annual charity concert at the London Palladium. And then there was the memorable Aunt Priscilla and a Lylie Hogg of whom she told me little. Aunt Priscilla was ‘mixed up with the Crumps’ and ‘had pots of money’. She lived in a big old Victorian house in the Old Kent Road, shopped at Harrods and ‘had shares in a South African diamond mine’. My mother and her brother Ted used to love going there and she has many memories of ‘fun and mischief’. ‘Everything in the house was musical’.  Aunt Priscilla was a ‘big woman’. I have seen a photograph of her as the archetypal Victorian aunt. Her husband John was completely dominated by Priscilla as he stands alongside her in the photograph. My mother has vivid memories of John and Priscilla. ‘Dear John,’ Aunt Priscilla would say, ‘go down to the basement and fetch some wine. Go straight down. Don’t touch a thing. And come straight back!’ When Aunt Priscilla died John threw open the house and the wine cellars to the whole of the Old Kent Road…and drank himself to death in four days flat! My mother’s marriage to my father was her second. Her first was to Les Rash from East London who was reported missing and eventually presumed dead in the disastrous 1941 invasion of Greece…there is a record at the allied cemetery in Piraeus. My mother kept a photograph of him on a camel by the pyramids in her (and my father’s) bedroom for as long as I can remember. She used to travel across the river to the East End once a month in the 1950s to visit ‘Nanna Rash’…presumably her mother-in-law. The only relative we knew well…because she lived close to us on Dumbreck Road in Eltham was another of my mother’s aunts…Florrie. She was on my grandfather’s side of the family, had lived for many years in Canada and was married to Will Woodstock who survived her by many years well into his late eighties. A visit to Aunty Florrie and Uncle Will was obligatory at Christmas. We had afternoon tea and always came away with half a crown each. Aunty Florrie played the piano fairly well, playing from sheet music many of the Tin Pan Alley musical favourites of the early years of the century…songs like ‘How much is the doggie in the window?’ are ingrained in my memory as a perennial feature of Christmas at Aunty Florrie’s. She had a dog…a white fluffy scotch terrier…and was the only relative I remember that had any animals in her house…a dog and a budgerigar.
written in June 1989 and updated in April 2007

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The Etherden Clan

Branches of the Etherden Clan
e-mail request to etherden@williamfranklin.com

The Hammond – Etherden Letters

Dear Peter. I am tracing my family history and believe you may be able to help. My Grandmother was Ada Louisa Etherden, the daughter of William Oliver Etherden a chief fire officer in London around 1900. His father was Charles Etherden who came from a long line of Thames Barge owners in Harwich. As it is such an unusual surname I wonder whether our families are connected in any way. I would be grateful for any information you are willing to give me about your ancestors. Many thanks.

Dear Jane. Yes they are indeed. I’ve got piles of stuff on this. But I’m in Llangolman in Pembrokeshire and all the stuff is on CDs on my boat in Rye on the other side of the country and I won’t be back there until mid-February. I’ll get back to you when I’m back in Rye. Yell at me in four weeks if you haven’t heard. Meanwhile if curiosity is killing you contact my cousin Doreen Cook ne Etherden. Her father Jack and my father William Franklin were two of a family of eight that are in a direct line. Where are you emailing me from – Sydney, Toronto, Cardiff?

Dear Peter. Thanks for the reply. I am only in Nottingham. I have had a reply from William in Keswick as well and I am sure that between us we will have a lot on the Etherden family. I would love to see what information you have. I am back to the mid 1700’s in Harwich. My Dad is the youngest son of Ada Louisa Etherden who married Sydney Victor Rogers in 1913. Her father was William Oliver Etherden, a chief fire officer in London. I have photos of their wedding, and also William’s retirement from the fire brigade. There are so many Williams that I get confused as to which one is our first shared direct ancestor, but I have no doubt that when we get back to John and Elizabeth Etherden c 1770 we are on the same line. I will contact you again in about four weeks. Many thanks.

Dear Jane. My nephew, William Etherden, in Keswick is my younger brother David’s son. Sadly David (1953-2015) died earlier this year at the age of 62. I have been blogging for ten years under a variety of names with over one million visitors to show for it…see here.

Benjamin is our most illustrious clan member. Nicked a pair of shoes in Lamberhurst in Kent, sentenced to death, commuted (as these sentences usually were) to transportation and now the patriarch of a large Australian Etherden clan who are the epitome of respectability as local mayors, members of chambers of commerce etc. Benjamin must be turning in his grave.

Dear Peter. Thanks. I think I am getting it sorted now. It is your nephew William who I have contacted and I have also written to your cousin as you suggested. In order to work out which William our line goes back through I need approximate dates of birth. I believe your Grandfather was William Franklin Etherden. His birth date would be very useful. If his father was also called William then he could have been either my father’s uncle or Grandfather. I am so glad that my Grandmother had an unusual surname like Etherden. I would have no chance if I was trying to sort out generations of William Smiths! Regards.

Dear Jane. Here are some family reminiscences from a grey Welsh winter’s morning…and from the top of my head. Hope you find them helpful. Attached are pictures of me too from 1980 and 2005.

Peter Etherden in Bretagne in 2005

William Franklin Etherden, my father was born on 22nd March 1906. The siblings we knew and met up with when we were growing up in the 1950s were Jack, Perce, Doris…the last surviving sibling who died in 1991 and who my cousin Doreen knew very well…and Betty who married Arthur Standen and had two children, Ron…who married Margaret and has three daughters and lives in Surrey…and Joan who now lives in the Isle of Wight and is married for the second time; to Leslie Attrill…Joan would just love to hear from you as she has always been really interested in family things.

Jack, Perce and my father William all worked together at the Royal Mint at some time in the 1920s and Jack rose pretty close to the top job and almost got a knighthood…Doreen has much more background. The Etherden Brothers seem to have been implicated in some nefarious but unproven goings-on which put a blot on my Uncle Jack’s career prospects. This was apparently also the reason that my maternal grandfather…who was pretty high up in the London Docks and could find out things…was against my mother’s second marriage – to my father…my mother’s first husband Les Rash from Bow in East London was killed in the Hitler War in Churchill’s suicidal attack on Greece in 1941.

My paternal grandfather was called William and was killed when a wall fell on him while working as a fireman in the First World War when my father was 13…and it is possible that my father was born in 1905 and not 1906.

There is a family name Norris that keeps cropping up that I adopted when taking on the pen name of William Norris Shepherd…Shepherd from the German ett herde meaning Shepherd although I no longer think this is the root of the name…the other theory being that all we East-therdens are related to the West-therdens, South-therdens (there are several in Rye Harbour in East Sussex) and North-therdens.

Peter Etherden at Walden Pond in 1980

My elder brother is John Clive born 19th June 1944 and my younger brother is Clifford Roy born 24th September 1948. David James the youngest…he of Keswick and father of Douglas and William… was born on 8th May 1953 just in time for the Queen’s coronation. I was born on 17th July 1946 and started up a Swedish branch of the family when I married Ingrid Lundell of Bromma born 28th March 1947 and was blessed with two children Linda Helena born 8th January 1973 and Nicholas John born 18th June 1975.

There is significant distortion in geneology research because of the obvious tendency to trace through the male surname. I would love to see more family trees set up as if we had a matriarchal tradition (like the Jews) where the woman is followed. How about it?

If you think you are getting close…think again. There is another branch of the Etherden clan maurading around in the Chichester area of Sussex under the name Eatherden. Rosemary is doing the research and is well worth contacting. She has changed her e-mail address as mailing to the one I have from a couple of years back get returned.

I now expect an e-greeting for my 60th birthday from my Nottingham relatives. But for the time being I’ll be satisfied if you tell me everything about yourself.Your family can wait until next time. From Great (Great) Uncle Peter oka William of Salisbury…and then some…

Dear Peter. Thanks for all that information. I have lots to sort out now. I can tell you where the ‘Norris’ comes from though. Charles Etherden, born in Harwich c1819 married Sarah Norris in 1851 at Greenwich. Her father was Gregory Norris. Their 6th child was named Gregory Norris Etherden after him. He was born in Faversham Kent in 1870. I can’t remember without checking my records, but I believe he also had a son who carried the name on. My Great Grandfather William Oliver Etherden was the older brother of Gregory Norris Etherden. It makes more sense when it is written out as a family tree. I should be working really (tax return due in!!!). I will reply in detail later. I am 53 yrs old so I think you and I are of the same generation but 3rd or 4th cousins or something. As you can tell I am really excited by all this. Hope I am not making a nuisance of myself. Will send more later.

Dear Jane. No nuisance. Don’t be silly. Buzz me any time you have anything interesting. I got my tax returns in nine months early…they usually go in on 29th January – a day or so before the fines start clicking in. But I had an incentive for my 2004-5 returns as I wanted to get into the Working Tax Credit system…it worked as I had voted for Gordon Brown in May 2005. Maybe I’ll get a knighthood too?

Here is the next generation of the William Franklin Etherden – Ethel Land of Eltham. We grew up in Eltham on the London-Kent border (now in Greenwich).

John married Sue Turner of Winchelsea: Louise, Katy & Thomas; Peter married Ingrid Lundell of Sweden: Linda Helena (b. 8.1.73) & Nicholas John (b.18.6.75); Clifford married a Nottingham girl Kath Fiddick: Andrew & Alison; David married Janet Buehay of Eltham: Douglas & William.

Dear Jane. I have created a weblog for The Etherden Clan so that our research can be made more readily available for others over the web. Do you have any worries about having this weblog in the public domain? I have put up our exchange as Posting Number One by way of an example for you to react to. You will find it at http://etherden.blog.co.uk. I can pull it, or edit it, or change the access rules…but I rather like it as it is…it has a nice feel about it.

Dear Peter. The weblog is a good idea, although I am a novice with this sort of thing so I am not sure how it works. I have discovered today that there were two William F. Etherdens, one born in the spring of 1906 and one a year later. I believe my Dad’s Uncle would have been William Frederick who was born in 1907. If that is the case then we are not second cousins ie sharing the same Great Grandparents, but probably third or fourth cousins (apparently you add 1 to the amount of Greats). I am determined to work it all out. I agree with you that we should really follow the maternal line each time. I have always said that, but I am following each side of every generation. I am entering it all on a PDF file so I can keep track. Do you know which fire brigade your Grandfather belonged to and where he died? I will try to attach a photo of my Great Grandfather. I was not able to contact Rosemary, my e mail bounced back. I hope she sees the weblog.

Dear Jane. Doreen has quite a bit about the London Fire Brigade connections including several photographs which she showed me but I wasn’t really paying attention as we were at an inn in Guildford having lunch after my Aunty Doris’ funeral.

Dear Peter. I have made some more progress with my research. According to the GRO William Franklin Etherden b22nd March 1906 was the son of Charles James Norris Etherden a London Fireman. I am almost certain that this Charles is a brother of William Oliver Etherden b1860 (my Great Grandfather) who was a chief fire officer in London until 1913. Their parents were Charles Etherden and Sarah Norris who married in Greenwich in 1851. Charles was a mariner at Harwich. I am in contact with a Richard Norris who lives in new Zealand. He has a lot of information about Sarah Norris’s ancestors many of whom were missionarys. I have also discovered that Charles Etherden’s father was John Etherden b1791 in Harwich and his father was also John. If you look on the genesreunited site you should be able to view our family tree. You will see that your father must have been my Grandmothers cousin.

Dear Peter. I have been in contact with your cousin Doreen and she has kindly sent me the Etherden family tree prepared by Paul Digby. It is clear that we are both descendants of Charles Etherden and Sarah Norris. They had 9 children, one of which, William Oliver was my Great Grandfather. Another was Charles James Norris Etherden- your Grandfather. Although you and I are of similar age, my Grandmother Ada was your father’s cousin. Therefore you are my fathers second cousin. So I am your second cousin once removed. I am now tracing the Norris line and have a lot of leads to follow. I will keep you informed of any developments.
Best wishes Jane

Good Day Peter. Would like to see our family history and tree,I have some great stories of The Brothers Etherden (East End Lads) going back to early Fifties. My Nan and Grandad and Aunts. Once received an inheritance from Family member in Australia.
From Derrick James Benjamin Etherden (Named after my dad Benjamin “Jim” and a younger brother of dad’s Derrick who I believed died at a young age)

Dear Derrick. Paul Digby, who did all the research on our family tree, eventually sent me 43 Adobe pdf files of what he had collected about the Etherdens. They came in several different batches which I glanced at and then stored on my hard drive. Here is what I ended up with. 4 of the files are summaries to help me find my way around the other 39;10 are documents…newspaper clippings, copies from records etc;17 are preliminary outlines of the various branches of the family; 12 are detailed geneologies of some of these branches. It would be fun to hear your stories. If you ever feel inspired to sit yourself in front of a videocamera or a webcam, we could post the recordings onto YouTube and share them with others in the clan. Two or three of you together swapping yarns about The Brothers Etherden would be even better. We ought to do the same with everybody else’s stories. Why not?
Peter


Other Etherden Letters 2006-2009

Larry Schiller

2006-12-03 @ 23:06:07

Peter —
The Yank from CH (1964) here!! Let’s reconnect. Try larry.schiller@couzens.com or lfschiller@comcast.net.


Daniel Etherden

2007-02-15 @ 00:59:57

Hey, My name is Daniel Etherden from Hamilton, ontario Canada. I dont know too much about my family history but I know I go back atleast 7 generations.


Jennifer Tobin

2007-04-28 @ 00:57:16

Hello just stumbled on this blog I am descended from Benjamin Etherden in Australia how does he fit in to the family ?from what I understand apart from his actual trial info his line is a dead end no-one has been able to get any further back.


Peter Etherden

2007-04-28 @ 01:40:31

Jennifer
Sounds like you’ve got yourself a good excuse to visit the UK. I would certainly be happy to help if you wanted to see what you could find out about one of our clan’s more illustrious ancestors. Lamberhurst in Kent is where Benjamin got nicked for stealing a pair of shoes and there were many Etherdens (and Eatherdens) in Sussex around that time so Kent and Sussex would be the place to look. We know of one gainfully employed Etherden…a Chair Bodger (an honorable trade at the time)…from this area. However I am told that once you get back to the beginning of the 19th century tracing ancestors becomes relatively easy as it is all in the parish records. We have some hints suggesting that Faversham Church is the place to look…so why not go for it?
Peter


Jennifer

2007-04-28 @ 13:00:09

Thank you Peter for that info it is much appreciated Kind Regards Jennifer


Rob Eatherden 

2008-01-08 @ 10:11:49

This Makes very interesting reading, I am an Eatherden born in Woolwhich south London (1960), I was brought up and lived in Eltham until I was 21 , my parents Mary and John had moved to Derbyshire in 1979, once I had finished college I decided it seemed a nice place to live and have lived in the Peak District since 1981. Both my granparents, Fred and Flo lived in Eltham (Westmount Road) until they died (mid 1980s), I have two brothers one now in Kendal, Cumbria the other in Highgate, London Sean and Pat. We were all aware that most Eatherdens had come from Rye in Sussex, we also have relatives in the Bristol Area, al Eatherdens with the a. Interesting to hear more news. I currently work in the Nottingham Area.
regards Rob Eatherden


Galinda Wood

2008-02-29 @ 03:25:32

Hi, my husband is a direct descendent of Benjamin Etherden (the convict).Before Ben we have no information at all. I hope we’re from the same family.
Cheers Galinda Wood


Stewart Willis

2009-01-15 @ 23:21:21

Hello,
My mother is Rose Etherden, daughter of Benjamin H Etherden, sister to Albert (Nunkie), Patric (Patsy,), Theodore(Dore), Benjamin (Jim).
Stewart Willis
rocksound@btinternet.com


Rhonda Gore Etherden

2010-06-02 @ 03:55:56

My husband is Graham Etherden and Paul Digby is married to his first cousin. His father was Ken Etherden who was the oldest of three children. His grandfather was Sid Etherden. Graham was born in Melton Mowbray–where his mother’s familiy lived. I am an American and we currently live in Conway, SC which is very close to Myrtle Beach. We know very little beyond what I have written. Any information would be most helpful and greatly appreciated. It is nice to know we aren’t the only Etherdens.


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